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Hi, I have one assignment. I am not upload the case study and instructions over here. So, I have uploaded it on mediafire. Here’s the link…….

https://www.mediafire.com/file/0bh72qr6yxilzzi/Assignment+2-restaurants-no-tipping-case.docx/file

Hi, I have one assignment. I am not upload the case study and instructions over here. So, I have uploaded it on mediafire. Here’s the link……. https://www.mediafire.com/file/0bh72qr6yxilzzi/Assign
11 Change Management: Restaurants’ No-Tipping Policy Case Name Institution Affiliation Question 1 The ADKAR model is a change management tool that can be used to help explain why the change management process at this restaurant failed. According to the model, there are five key stages that need to be completed in order for a successful change to occur (ANGTYAN, 2019): Awareness: Employees need to be aware of the change and what it entails. Furthermore, they need to understand why the change is taking place and how it will impact them. Based on this first stage, the restaurant failed because employees were not given enough information about the change (ANGTYAN, 2019). Furthermore, they were not made aware of how the change would impact them financially. From the case study, it is evident that employees only became aware of the pay cut once the change was implemented, which led to confusion and frustration. Furthermore, it is unmistakable that Steve Brown, the CEO of the restaurant, was aware that change was necessary. He was aware that the current tipping system was unfair to backend employees, and he was also aware that the income gap between frontline and backend employees was too large. Desire: Once employees are aware of the change, they need to develop a desire to support it. This can be done by communicating the benefits of the change and how it will positively impact them. In this case, the restaurant failed because employees were not given any incentive to support the change (ANGTYAN, 2019). In fact, they were told that their wages would be cut, which led to a negative desire for change. The CEO also promised that servers would make the same or more money, which was not the case. As a result, employees felt misled and were not motivated to support the change. Nevertheless, it is evident that Steve Brown desired to change the current system. He desired to eliminate the practice of tipping in order to create a more fair system for all employees. Knowledge: For employees to successfully implement the change, they need to have the knowledge and skills necessary. This includes understanding what needs to be done and how to do it. In this case, it is apparent that Brown had the knowledge needed to transform the system (Jaaron et al., 2021). He had the basics to implement the no-tipping strategy and was also aware of the way to upturn food prices to recompense for the loss of tips. The restaurant failed in this area because they did not provide employees with the training they needed to successfully implement the new policy. Furthermore, they hired underqualified and untrained staff to fill the gaps, which led to service issues. Ability: Even if employees have the desire and knowledge to support the change, they may not be able to do so if they lack the ability. This includes having the resources, time, and support necessary to make the change. Based on the case study, it is obvious that Brown had the ability to change the system. He implemented the no-tipping policy and increased food prices (Jaaron et al., 2021). However, the restaurant failed in this area because they did not give employees the resources they needed to successfully implement the new policy. Furthermore, they implemented the change too quickly, which left employees feeling overwhelmed. From the case study, it is evident that the restaurant did not take the necessary steps to ensure a successful change. Consequently, the change management process failed, which led to the decline of the restaurant. Reinforcement: Finally, it is important to reinforce the change by continuing to support employees after it has been implemented. This includes providing feedback, recognition, and reinforcement. The restaurant failed in this area because they did not provide employees with the feedback and support they needed to continue to be successful. The restaurant also failed to recognize the employees who were doing a good job, which led to frustration. Based on the case study, Brown was not reinforced for changing the system. He was not given any reinforcement from employees or customers. In fact, he got negative reinforcement from staffs and customers (Jaaron et al., 2021). Employees left the restaurant because they were not being paid as much as they were under the old system, and customers stopped coming to the restaurant because they did not like the new policy. Consequently, the change management process failed, and the restaurant declined. Based on the ADKAR model, it is clear that there were several key areas where the change management process at this restaurant failed (Goyal & Patwardhan, 2018). First, employees were not given enough information about the change and why it was taking place. This made it difficult for them to understand why the change was necessary and how it would impact them. Second, employees were not given the opportunity to have their say in the change process. This led to a lack of buy-in and desire to support the change. Third, employees were not given adequate training and support to help them implement the change successfully. This made it difficult for them to overcome challenges and put the change into practice. Finally, there was a lack of ongoing reinforcement which made it difficult for employees to sustain the change over time (Goyal & Patwardhan, 2018). In conclusion, the change management process at this restaurant failed because employees were not given enough information, support, or reinforcement to successfully implement the change. By understanding the key stages of the ADKAR model, we can better understand why the change management process failed and what needs to be done in order to avoid similar failures in the future. Question 2 The Kotter’s 8-Step change management system is a framework that can be used to help an organization successfully navigate through a period of change. The steps are as follows (Kotter & von Ameln, 2019): 1. Establishing a sense of urgency: In order for change to be successful, it is important to create a sense of urgency within the organization. This can be done by highlighting the need for change and demonstrating the consequences of inaction (Kotter & von Ameln, 2019). 2. Creating a guiding coalition: A group of key stakeholders should be brought together to champion the change initiative. This team should be diverse and have credibility within the organization (Kotter & von Ameln, 2019). 3. Developing a vision and strategy: The vision for change should be developed and communicated to all members of the organization. Additionally, a plan for how to achieve this vision should be created (Kotter & von Ameln, 2019). 4. Communicating the change vision: Once the vision has been developed, it is important to communicate it to all employees. This can be done through presentations, memos, or town hall meetings (Kotter & von Ameln, 2019). 5. Empowering employees to act: Employees should be given the authority and resources necessary to enact change (Doll & Miller, 2008). Additionally, they should be held accountable for their performance. 6. Generating short-term wins: It is important to generate quick successes in order to build momentum for the change initiative (Doll & Miller, 2008). These wins should be aligned with the overall vision. 7. Consolidating gains and producing more change: Once some success has been achieved, it is important to consolidate these gains and continue working towards further change (Doll & Miller, 2008). This can be done by making permanent changes to policies and procedures. 8. Anchoring new approaches in the culture: The final step is to embed the new ways of doing things into the organization’s culture. This can be done through training, reinforcement, and rewards (Doll & Miller, 2008). 1. Establishing a sense of urgency: The CEO should have established a sense of urgency among employees regarding the need for change (Doll & Miller, 2008). He should have explained to employees how the current system is not sustainable in the long run and how the new system will be beneficial for them. 2. Creating a guiding coalition: The CEO should have created a team of employees who were supportive of the change and who could help him implement the new system. This team would be responsible for communicating the change to other employees and helping them understand and accept it (Laig & Abocejo, 2021). 3. Developing a vision and strategy: The CEO should have developed a clear vision for the change and a strategy for how it would be implemented (Laig & Abocejo, 2021). He should have communicated this vision to employees so that they could understand and buy into it. 4. Communicating the change vision: The CEO should have communicated the change vision to employees in a way that was clear and easy to understand (Laig & Abocejo, 2021). He should have explained how the new system would work and what benefits it would bring. 5. Empowering employees to act: The CEO should have empowered employees to act by giving them the resources and authority to make the change happen (Laig & Abocejo, 2021). He should have allowed them to take ownership of the process and make decisions about how to implement the new system. 6. Planning for and creating short-term wins: The CEO should have planned for and created short-term wins that would show employees that the new system was working and that they were making progress (Laig & Abocejo, 2021). These wins would build momentum and keep employees motivated to continue working towards the change. 7. Consolidating gains and producing more change: The CEO should have consolidated the gains made by the change and continued to push for more change. He should have continued to communicate the benefits of the new system and why it was necessary. 8. Institutionalizing new approaches: The CEO should have institutionalized the new system by making it a permanent part of the organization (Laig & Abocejo, 2021). He should have put policies and procedures in place to ensure that the new system was followed and that employees were held accountable for their performance (Laig & Abocejo, 2021). CEO Steve Brown should have followed these steps in order to successfully implement the no-tipping policy (Gupta, 2011). First, he should have established a sense of urgency within the organization by highlighting the need for change and demonstrating the consequences of inaction. Second, he should have assembled a team of key stakeholders to champion the initiative (Gupta, 2011). Third, he should have developed a clear vision for change and communicated it to all employees. Fourth, he should have empowered employees to act by giving them the resources and authority necessary to enact change. Fifth, he should have generated some quick successes to build momentum for the initiative. Sixth, he should have consolidated these gains and continued working towards further change. Finally, he should have anchored the new approaches in the culture by training employees and reinforcing the new ways of doing things (Gupta, 2011). Kotter’s 8-step change management model is a useful framework for organizations to use when navigating through periods of change. CEO Steve Brown should have followed this model in order to successfully implement the no-tipping policy. By doing so, he would have been more likely to gain buy-in from employees and achieve long-term success. References ANGTYAN, H. (2019). ADKAR Model in Change Management. International Review of Management and Business Research, 8(2), 179-182. https://doi.org/10.30543/8-2(2019)-4 Doll, Y., & Miller, B. (2008). Applying the Kotter Model: Making Transformational Change in a Large Organization. The International Journal of Knowledge, Culture, and Change Management: Annual Review, 8(1), 53-60. https://doi.org/10.18848/1447- 9524/cgp/v08i01/50438. Goyal, C., & Patwardhan, M. (2018). Role of change management using ADKAR model: a study of the gender perspective in a leading bank organisation of India. International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management, 18(3/4), 297. https://doi.org/10.1504/ijhrdm.2018.093442. Gupta, P. (2011). Leading Innovation Change – The Kotter Way. International Journal of Innovation Science, 3(3), 141-150. https://doi.org/10.1260/1757-2223.3.3.141. Jaaron, A., Hijazi, I., & Musleh, K. (2021). A conceptual model for adoption of BIM in construction projects: ADKAR as an integrative model of change management. Technology Analysis &Amp; Strategic Management, 34(6), 655-667. https://doi.org/10.1080/09537325.2021.1915975. Kotter, J., & von Ameln, F. (2019). Agility, hierarchy and lessons for the future. John Kotter on the legacy and future of Change Management. Gruppe. Interaktion. Organisation. Zeitschrift Für Angewandte Organisationspsychologie (GIO), 50(2), 111-114. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11612-019-00461-5. Laig, R., & Abocejo, F. (2021). Change Management Process in a Mining Company: Kotter’s 8- Step Change Model. Journal of Management, Economics, and Industrial Organization, 31-50. https://doi.org/10.31039/jomeino.2021.5.3.3.

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