Subject: Training and Development Management I have the title already for this coursework. Title: Pre-Employment Skills Training Target respondent: Fresh Graduate Objective: 1. To educate trainee on r

Do you require help with your paper? Use our custom writing service to achieve better grades and meet your deadlines. Trust our team of writing experts with your work today, and enjoy peace of mind.


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper

Subject: Training and Development Management

I have the title already for this coursework.

Title: Pre-Employment Skills Training

Target respondent: Fresh Graduate

Objective: 1. To educate trainee on resume preparation for job application.

2. To expose trainee on pre and post interview skills and engagement.

3. To develop social and entrepreneur skills for job enrolment.

If have reference, include reference.

Pages 15-20.

Subject: Training and Development Management I have the title already for this coursework. Title: Pre-Employment Skills Training Target respondent: Fresh Graduate Objective: 1. To educate trainee on r
TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT COURSE ASSESSMENTS A. GROUP ASSIGNMENT (35%) Instruction: Working in a group of two members (consisting of different race and gender) you are required to develop a training module to be used in training participant in order to boost their competencies and enhance productivity. You may use guidelines as provided below: 1. The 10-step process for developing training courses The process for developing performance-based training includes the following 10 steps. The first four steps constitute the task analysis that is necessary to design and develop relevant, useful training materials. Steps 5–10 constitute the design and development process. Task analysis Design and development Define the target population for training. List the tasks to be performed by the target population on the job. List the skills and knowledge needed to do the tasks. Select the skills and knowledge to be taught. (These make up the “training objectives.”) Organize the selected skills and knowledge into suitable teaching units (modules) and develop the training design (including brief outlines of module content and planned training methods). Draft expanded outlines of modules, including instructional objectives, main body of text, and descriptions of training methods, examples and exercises. 7. Experts provide realistic examples and information for use in exercises. Draft the complete modules, facilitator guidelines, and course director guidelines. Field-test the training materials. Revise and finalize training materials based on the field test. Defining the target population The target population is the group of learners for whom the training is intended. It is critical to define this group in order to design the training appropriately. For example, training for clinicians would be very different from training for new community health workers, even though they may do some of the same tasks. To define the target population, ask questions such as: What are the job titles of the intended participants in the training? How were they originally trained for their jobs? What are their educational and professional backgrounds? Are they still in school or already on the job? What languages do they speak and read? Is it possible for them to attend a training course away from their jobs? Example (the way how to write the target population) The target population for Management of tuberculosis: training for health facility staff includes health workers at health centres, hospital outpatient departments, dispensaries or health posts, all of which are referred to in the course as “health facilities”. Health workers at this level may include health assistants, medical assistants, nurses, clinical assistants, clinicians or physicians. Some may be private practitioners. They may or may not be able to attend 5 days of training away from their jobs, so options are given for conducting the course in a series of shorter sessions as well. The target population for Management of tuberculosis: training for district TB coordinators includes individuals responsible for planning, organizing, implementing and evaluating the activities of a district TB control programme. A district usually serves a population of 100 000 or more. The District TB Coordinator is usually a physician or a nurse. He or she may have clinical duties, but the job is primarily administrative and managerial. The District TB Coordinator has no direct supervisory authority over health facility staff, but is responsible for overseeing their performance of tasks related to TB case detection and treatment in health facilities. In some districts, a team of people may work together to carry out the tasks of the District TB Coordinator. 1.2 Listing the tasks to be performed by the target population To list the tasks to be performed by the target population, one must know what “good performance” is, in other words, what a good performer would do on the job. To find out, the training developers must have access to: • technical experts who can accurately describe the job, • good performers who can be observed doing the job, and/or • documents and manuals that accurately describe the job. Through discussion with experts, observations, and review of documents, the training developers develop a step-by-step task list. 1.3 Listing the skills and knowledge needed to do the tasks For each task involved in a job, the training developers next list the skills and knowledge required to perform the task. Skills are generally actions such as measuring, mixing, recording, calculating, communicating, or making decisions. Required knowledge is the information needed to do a task correctly. Example One task involved in treating patients who have TB is to Inform the patient and family about TB and directly observed treatment. One skill required for this task is to communicate clearly in a supportive way. Required knowledge includes the key facts that must be communicated about TB and its treatment. Making a list of required skills and knowledge often necessitates more questioning of experts to explore what is involved in each task. The final list of skills and knowledge can be very lengthy, and it becomes obvious that choices must be made about which skills and knowledge are most important to teach. Selecting the skills and knowledge to be taught (training objectives) Experts use a list of criteria to decide which skills and knowledge to include in the training. These will make up the training objectives for the course. The selection criteria may include such factors as the following. The first list below shows factors that would lead to inclusion in the course; the second list shows factors that would suggest that the skill or knowledge could be excluded (not taught) in the course. Some of the factors may be more or less relevant in different situations. Possible criteria for inclusion Many members of the target population lack the skill or knowledge. Training (including practice and feedback) is required to learn the skill or knowledge because it is new or difficult. The task for which the skill or knowledge is needed is important to the patient’s outcome. The skill or knowledge is needed frequently. It is practical to teach the skill or knowledge in the given training setting. Possible criteria for exclusion The task, skill or knowledge cannot be described specifically and thoroughly enough to be a meaningful part of training. (This may be because of differences of opinion among technical experts, lack of authoritative evidence on how the task should best be done, etc.) Teaching the skill or knowledge is not practical in the time or with the resources available. Most members of the target population already have the skill or knowledge. The task, skill or knowledge is straightforward and could be done correctly after reading guidelines such as a checklist or manual. Practice and feedback are not required. The task is done or the skill/knowledge is used infrequently (e.g. it deals with a condition that is extremely rare). The task is done differently in different areas or health facilities (must be tailored to a unique setting). The task for which the skill or knowledge is needed is of low importance to the outcome of the patient. There are substantial obstacles to doing the task (such as lack of equipment, drugs or time) that would prevent health workers from doing the task even if they knew how. These obstacles would have to be overcome before the training could be useful. Another training course is available to teach the task/skill/knowledge. Similar criteria can be used to decide which of the included tasks, skills and knowledge will receive more emphasis and practice in the training course. Example In determining skills and knowledge to be included in the Management of tuberculosis courses, most of the tasks, skills and knowledge listed for the health facility and district-level personnel were selected to be described in the text, but fewer were selected to be emphasized and practised. For example, it was decided that the skills and knowledge to conduct special studies (listed on pages 88–89) could not practically be taught in the district-level course. In addition, it was not as important to teach these skills and knowledge because special studies are done infrequently at the district level. Some information and sample protocols for special studies were provided in an annex to Module I: Develop the District Plan of Action for TB Control, but the skills and knowledge did not receive emphasis in the course and were not practised. 1.5 Designing and developing the training course Steps 5–10 of the 10-step process include designing the training and fully developing the course based on the task analysis. As part of the design process, the training developers organize the selected skills and knowledge to be taught into logical teaching units called modules. The design for each module includes its training objectives and a brief outline of the information, examples and exercises that will provide opportunities for practise using the skills and knowledge. Development of each module progresses from the brief design outline, to an expanded outline, to the complete module. Expanded outlines of the modules specify more completely the information and the types of examples and exercises to be provided. For example, examples might be given through pictures, live demonstrations or video. Exercises might include written exercises, group discussions, role plays or clinical practice. To develop realistic examples and exercises, the training developers rely on interviews with technical experts who are familiar with the target population, job setting, tasks and conditions. Development of complete modules includes preparation of guidelines for the facilitators who will conduct the course. Guidelines for a course director may also be needed. Finally, the modules and associated guidelines are reviewed by technical experts and field-tested with the target population. The training materials are then revised and finalized based on reviews and results of the field test. the information and the types of examples and exercises to be provided. For example, examples might be given through pictures, live demonstrations or video. Exercises might include written exercises, group discussions, role plays or clinical practice. To develop realistic examples and exercises, the training developers rely on interviews with technical experts who are familiar with the target population, job setting, tasks and conditions. Development of complete modules includes preparation of guidelines for the facilitators who will conduct the course. Guidelines for a course director may also be needed. Finally, the modules and associated guidelines are reviewed by technical experts and field-tested with the target population. The training materials are then revised and finalized based on reviews and results of the field test 3

Writerbay.net

Our writing experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essays, research papers, lab reports, and dissertations, to online classes, you can be sure we have a service that perfectly matches your needs.


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper