Summative Final Summative Assessment/Project *worth 24 possible points (see scoring rubric) Objective: Create a week (5 days) of Literacy Lesson Plans utilizing ONE Mentor Text for the duration of

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Summative

Final Summative Assessment/Project *worth 24 possible points (see scoring rubric) Objective: Create a week (5 days) of Literacy Lesson Plans utilizing ONE Mentor Text for the duration of the week and planning. These literacy lesson plans can include both reading and writing lessons. **Unlike the mid-course project these plans will be aligned to one grade level. With the big idea that they may be taught within the same classroom. Please select the grade level of your choice, Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten, First Grade, Second Grade or Third Grade. Tools Needed: A Mentor text/Picture Book The Lesson Plan format provided by the University of Maine at Presque Isle Education Department (attached to this assignment) Locate some Early Literacy Activities to incorporate into your Lesson plans. Literacy Websites for Preschoolers http://www.literacy.uconn.edu/pksites.htm Reading Rockets http://www.readingrockets.org/resources_new/c581 U.S. Department of Education Early Learning Resources https://www.ed.gov/early-learning/resources Family Reading Partnership http://www.familyreading.org/great-ideas/favorite-websites/websites-promoting-literacy/ (or any other resources you desire to utilize or have access to) ***(Note the Common Core Standards are not explicitly requested on your lesson template however, you may want to include some as most school leaders and districts require them on lesson plans and they may assist you with developing your learning objectives.) A copy of the Common Core Standards http://www.corestandards.org/ ** (A peek at my Lesson Plans for a week of Literacy Instruction…) I have attached a sample of my literacy plans for one week of instruction. Note that my lesson plan template is much different from the one you will use, but it will give you an idea of what your final product might include.

Use this link to find the standards and create essential questions

https://www.literacyta.com/literacy-standards/maine#:~:text=Maine%20literacy%20standards%20require%20explicit%2C%20skill-based%20instruction%20for,are%20now%20the%20focus%20of%20Maine%27s%20literacy%20curriculum.

Summative Final Summative Assessment/Project *worth 24 possible points (see scoring rubric) Objective: Create a week (5 days) of Literacy Lesson Plans utilizing ONE Mentor Text for the duration of
LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE (Sample) CLASS: _____________________________ UNIT: ________________________________________ ESSENTIAL QUESTION: ________________________________________________________________________________________________ LEARNING TARGET: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ This is important because _______________________________________________________________________________________________ TIME ACTIVITY (sample) NOTES / RESOURCES OPENING (3-10 minutes) Question /Hook/ problem of the day posted for students to work on as they enter Establish the Learning Environment Warm-up; Activate prior knowledge; Spark interest MINI-LESSON (10-15 min) Quick review of skill that has been this unit’s focus (e.g., scale practice in music; conversation in world language; use of metaphor); “unpack” learning target; demonstration of new skill Define Clear, Shared Outcomes WHAT is the learning objective? WHY is this important? Relevant? What does this look like? How do I do this? (“I do”) GUIDED PRACTICE (10-20 min) Prompt for students to work in small groups or individually to practice the new skill or solve a problem; teacher observes and provides feedback Provide Practice and Feedback for Complex Thinking and Transfer Gradual release of responsibility (“we do”) Use scaffolding, graphic organizers Observe and check for understanding: “What does this student’s response tell me about what s/he knows / doesn’t know?” INDIVIDUAL/ GROUP WORK (30-40 min) Task for students to complete to practice the day’s learning target independently, in pairs or in small groups (e.g., read/respond to a text; solve a series of problems; conduct a lab; apply a new skill) Provide Varied Content, Materials, Methods (Differentiate) Practice and Feedback for Complex Thinking and Transfer Individually, pairs, small groups; opportunities for choice, differentiation Practice with familiar materials, concepts (“you do”) Challenge with application to new situations CLOSING (5-15 min) Small groups/ individuals report to full class (e.g., successes, challenges, next steps); 3-2-1 exit ticket aligned with the day’s learning target (3 things I learned, 2 questions I have, 1 next step I’ll take) Synthesis; Check for understanding (formative assessment) Next steps For students: homework; request supports/extensions of learning; For teachers: sort student responses to exit ticket/ formative assessment to determine adjustments in plans for next class LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE CLASS/GRADE: ________________________ UNIT: ________________________________________ ESSENTIAL QUESTION: ________________________________________________________________________________________________ LEARNING TARGET: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ This is important because _______________________________________________________________________________________________ TIME ACTIVITY NOTES / RESOURCES OPENING (3-10 minutes) MINI-LESSON (10-15 min) GUIDED PRACTICE (10-20 min) INDIVIDUAL/ GROUP WORK (30-40 min) CLOSING (5-15 min) Great Schools Partnership, August 2018
Summative Final Summative Assessment/Project *worth 24 possible points (see scoring rubric) Objective: Create a week (5 days) of Literacy Lesson Plans utilizing ONE Mentor Text for the duration of
Rubric for Summative Assessment/Project (The project is based on 24 possible points) 2 Minimal Proficiency 3 Proficiency 4 Advanced Proficiency Score (2, 3, or 4) Introduction/Opening The lesson plans do not include an introduction/opening and/or is missing establishing the learning environment and/or activating prior knowledge. . The lesson plans include: Establishing the Learning Environment Activating prior knowledge The lesson plans extend and goes beyond the lesson plan stated components of the introduction/opening Mini Lessons The lesson plans include ONE of these components: Define Clear, Shared Outcomes WHAT is the learning objective? WHY is this important? Relevant? The lesson plans include TWO of these components Define Clear, Shared Outcomes WHAT is the learning objective? WHY is this important? Relevant? The lesson plans include ALL of these components Define Clear, Shared Outcomes WHAT is the learning objective? WHY is this important? Relevant? Guided Practice The lesson plans include TWO or less of these components: Provide Practice and Feedback for Complex Thinking and Transfer Gradual release of responsibility (“we do”) Use scaffolding, graphic organizers Observe and check for understanding The lesson plans include THREE of these components: Provide Practice and Feedback for Complex Thinking and Transfer Gradual release of responsibility (“we do”) Use scaffolding, graphic organizers Observe and check for understanding The lesson plans include ALL of these components: Provide Practice and Feedback for Complex Thinking and Transfer Gradual release of responsibility (“we do”) Use scaffolding, graphic organizers Observe and check for understanding Independent Practice The lesson plans include TWO or LESS components: Provide Varied Content, Materials, Methods, Differentiate Practice and Feedback for Complex Thinking and Transfer Individually, pairs, small groups; opportunities for choice, differentiation Practice with familiar materials, concepts (“you do”) The lesson plans include ALL THREE components: Provide Varied Content, Materials, Methods, Differentiate Practice and Feedback for Complex Thinking and Transfer Individually, pairs, small groups; opportunities for choice, differentiation Practice with familiar materials, concepts (“you do”) The lesson plans include ALL THREE and (Challenges with application to new situations) Provide Varied Content, Materials, Methods, Differentiate Practice and Feedback for Complex Thinking and Transfer Individually, pairs, small groups; opportunities for choice, differentiation Practice with familiar materials, concepts (“you do”) Closing The lesson plans include ONE of the following: Synthesis; Check for understanding (formative assessment) Next steps The lesson plans include ALL of the following: Synthesis; Check for understanding (formative assessment) Next steps The lesson plans include ALL of the following and extensions of learning Synthesis; Check for understanding (formative assessment) Next steps Conventions The lesson plans contain numerous errors in spelling, grammar, punctuation, or sentence structure that interfere with comprehension. The lesson plans contain some errors in spelling, grammar, punctuation, or sentence structure, but these errors do not interfere with comprehension. The lesson plans contain few or no errors in spelling, grammar, punctuation or sentence structure.
Summative Final Summative Assessment/Project *worth 24 possible points (see scoring rubric) Objective: Create a week (5 days) of Literacy Lesson Plans utilizing ONE Mentor Text for the duration of
A Week of Literacy Lesson Plans with Mentor Text: Lindeen, C. (2016). Life in a pond. North Mankato, MN: Capstone Press, a Capstone imprint. Literacy/Reading Workshop- Monday, October 1st Lesson: 1 Unit: 1 Module: B Anchor Text: Life in a Pond Objective: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. RI.K.1, Engage in group reading activities. RL.K.10 Essential Questions: How do readers use text evidence to answer questions about informational texts? How do writers explain information about a topic? (Build Understanding, Close Read, Benchmark Vocabulary, Text Analysis) Build Understanding First Read: Read the entire book. Set the Purpose: Writers understand that informational texts provide answers to questions about topics. We use details from the text to answer questions about facts in the texts. Engage Children: Introduce the book Life in a Pond. Display the front and back covers and have children identify them and tell what they see. Point to the title and the author’s name as you read it aloud. Read: Have children look at the illustrations and follow the words from left to right and top to bottom as you read. In this first reading, children should focus on understanding what the text is about. Turn and Talk: Which is bigger, a pond or a lake? Close Read Cite Text Evidence: • Look at the front cover of the book. How do the title and picture help readers know what the text is about? (The title is about life in a pond. The photograph shows a pond, plants, and a turtle. Readers can use these clues to figure out that the text is about ponds and the plants and animals that live in them.) DOK L2 • How are ponds different from lakes? (Ponds are smaller than lakes.) Show me the page with this detail. Ask children to describe the photograph on p. 7. DOK L3 • What animals live in a pond? (fish, ducks, frogs) How do all the animals move in the water? (They swim.). DOK L3 • In what parts of a pond can plants live? How do you know? (They can live on top of the water, in the middle, and at the bottom. Pictures show water lilies on top and cattails in the middle. The text says plants grow on the bottom.) DOK L2 Scaffolding Instruction English Language Learners: Help children understand that the word body has more than one meaning. Body can mean a person’s head, arms, and so on. A body of water is a lot of water on the land or next to the land. On p. 4, the word body means a lot of water surrounded by land. Strategic Support: Read aloud the heading “Pond Animals” on p. 8. Tell children that it shows that the next pages will be about animals in a pond. They can use the headings to see what a section in a text is about. Benchmark Vocabulary Objectives: Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text. RL.K.4 Use words acquired from texts. L.K.6 Identify the author and illustrator of a story and tell what each does. RL.K.6 Text-Based Vocabulary: • pond, p. 4 • shallow, p. 4 Practice: Use p. 34 in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the Benchmark Vocabulary. Monitor children’s vocabulary development. Text Analysis AUTHOR AND ILLUSTRATOR ROLES Remind children that the person who writes a text is the author. The person who creates the pictures for a text is the illustrator. MODEL The author of Life in a Pond is Carol K. Lindeen. There is no illustrator because the text uses photographs. The words give some details about the topic of the text. The photographs also provide some of the details. We can talk about some details the words give and some details the photographs give. PRACTICE/APPLY Read the names of the author and illustrator of another informational book in the classroom. Display a page in the book. Have children explain what the author and the photographer contributed to the page. Use the Small Group Discussion Routine on pp. TR10–TR11 to have children discuss how the author and illustrator give facts. Check understanding by asking children to share or by circulating among children or groups. Make sure they are using best practices for speaking and listening as outlined in the routine. Guided Reading/Independent Practice (Focused Independent Reading, Small Group Options, Reading Analysis Extension) Focused Independent Reading Reading Analysis Extension Today’s Process Focus: Engagement and Identity Have children record their reading in a daily reading log by drawing a picture or dictating or writing a word, phrase, or sentence about their book. Suggest that they also draw pictures of the book’s topic in their reading log. Today’s Strategy Focus: Comprehension Have children point out their self-stick notes and explain why they liked the illustration or photograph. Ask children to choose another informational book from the classroom library. Have them look at the cover and title page and point out the author’s and illustrator’s names. Then have them look in the book to find examples they can use to show what the author and illustrator do. Have children take turns sharing their books and information with the class. Literacy/Reading Workshop -Tuesday, October 2 Lesson: 2 Unit: 1 Module: B Anchor Text: Life in a Pond Objective: Describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear. RL.K.7, Engage in group reading activities. RL.K.10 Essential Questions: How do readers use text evidence to answer questions about informational texts? How do writers explain information about a topic? (Build Understanding, Close Read, Benchmark Vocabulary, Text Analysis) Build Understanding First Read: pp. 4–7 Set the Purpose: Readers understand that answering questions helps them understand information in texts. When we answer questions about a text we read, we can better understand what we are reading. The answers to our questions can help us figure out the main topic of the text, or what the text is mostly about. Engage Children: Display the front cover of Life in a Pond. Have children use the title and illustration to recall details about the book. Read: Have children follow along as you read. When you get to the end of a page, ask them where you should read next (top of the next page). In this first reading, children should focus on understanding the main topic of the section and key details that support it. Turn and Talk: Where can you find a pond? Close Read Cite Text Evidence: • What is the title of this section? (“What Are Ponds?”) How does the title of a section help readers? (It tells readers what a section is about.) DOK L2 • What is a pond? (a small body of still, shallow water) Have children read aloud with you the sentence on p. 4 that defines the word. DOK L2 • Look at the photograph on page 5. How do you know that this is a pond? (Possible responses: It looks like a small body of water. The water looks still. It looks shallow.) DOK L2 • Where can you find a pond? (in many parts of the world) Listen as I reread the first sentence on page 6. The sentence tells the answer to the question. DOK L1 • Could you find a pond in New York City? How do you know? (Yes, because the text says that ponds can form in cities. New York City is a city.) DOK L3 • Look at the photograph on page 7. Where is this pond? How do you know? (It is in a forest. I know a forest is a group of trees that covers a big area.) DOK L2 • What questions can you ask about ponds after reading this section? (Responses will vary.) What can you do to figure out the answers to your questions? (Possible response: We can look in other books. We can ask others.) DOK L2 Scaffolding Instruction English Language Learners: Children may not understand the phrase ponds form. Explain that the word form means “to take shape.” Strategic Support: Children may have difficulty understanding the size of a pond. Draw a large, a medium, and a small circle on the board. Label the smallest circle pond, the medium circle lake, and the large circle ocean. Benchmark Vocabulary Objectives: Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text. RL.K.4 Use words acquired from texts. L.K.6 Identify and discuss the main topic of a text. RI.K.2 Text-Based Vocabulary: • forests, p. 6 • farms, p. 6 • lakes, p. 6 Practice: Use p. 36 in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the Benchmark Vocabulary. Monitor children’s vocabulary development. Text Analysis MAIN TOPIC Explain to children that the main topic, or main idea, is what a text is mostly about. Most informational texts are about one topic. The topic is the focus of the text. The key details in the text tell more about the main topic, or idea. Display the Main Idea Chart on p. TR40. MODEL I know that the book is mostly about ponds, so I will write ponds at the top of the chart under Main Idea. One key detail is that ponds are in forests, farms, and cities. I’ll write that in the first Key Detail box. What are some other key details in the text? Let’s write them on the chart too. PRACTICE/APPLY Have children use the completed graphic organizer to draw a picture of the main topic, or idea, of Life in a Pond. Tell them to use the photographs to add details to their drawings. Use the Small Group Discussion Routine on pp. TR10–TR11 to have children discuss why it is important to identify the text’s main topic. Check understanding by asking children to share or by circulating among children or groups. Make sure they are using best practices for speaking and listening as outlined in the routine. Guided Reading/Independent Practice (Focused Independent Reading, Small Group Options, Reading Analysis Extension) Focused Independent Reading Reading Analysis Extension Today’s Process Focus: Engagement and Identity Have children record their reading in a daily reading log by drawing a picture or dictating or writing a word, phrase, or sentence about the main topic of their book. Suggest that they also draw pictures of their favorite part of the book in their reading log. Today’s Strategy Focus: Decoding and Word Recognition Have children point out places where they marked the words the and little. Read the sentences with the words and have children repeat. Alternatively, have children log into Pearson Realize and review with you the Independent Reading Activity they completed for their book. Have children discuss what the term main topic means. Then ask them to tell how they would identify the main topic, or idea, of a text. Tell children to turn to p. 55 of their Text Collection and review “A New Home for Hermit Crab.” Ask them to identify the main topic of the text and two key details that support that topic. Then have children draw a picture of the main topic. Literacy/Reading Workshop- Wednesday, October 3 Lesson: 3 Unit: 1 Module: B Anchor Text: Life in a Pond Objective: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. RI.K.1, Engage in group reading activities. RL.K.10 Essential Questions: How do readers use text evidence to answer questions about informational texts? How do writers explain information about a topic? (Build Understanding, Close Read, Benchmark Vocabulary, Text Analysis) Build Understanding First Read: pp. 8–13 Set the Purpose: Learners understand that the environment affects living things. We can use the key details we learn about the environment in Life in a Pond to understand how it affects the plants and animals that live there. EXPLORE POETRY Display the poem “Daddy Fell into the Pond” on p. 61 of the Text Collection as you read it aloud. Ask children how they know this is a poem. Have them identify the rhyming words in the poem. Then ask children to produce additional rhyming words for the ones they recognized in the poem. Engage Children: Display the cover of Life in a Pond and have children recall what the book is about. Then display p. 8 and read aloud the title “Pond Animals.” Have children talk about what they think they will learn in this part of the book. Read: Have them look at the photographs and follow along as you read. Ask them to find and read the names of the animals they see. In this reading, children should focus on the different kinds of animals that live in a pond. Turn and Talk: What is one animal that lives in a pond? Close Read Second Read: pp. 8–13 Cite Text Evidence: • Display the photograph on p. 9. What kind of animal is this? (a fish) How do fish breathe in the water? (They breathe through gills.) Have children point to the word gills in the text. DOK L2 • Display the photograph on p. 11. What are these? (ducks) Where do ducks look for food? (underwater) How do ducks look underwater for food? (They dive under the water.) DOK L2 • What is something both ducks and fish do in a pond? (They both swim.) Have children the find words and pictures that support their answer to this question. DOK L3 • What do frogs do? (They kick and swim. They eat insects.) How do you know that? (The words on page 12 say so.) DOK L3 • Animals need food to survive, or live. What do you think would happen if there were no insects for ducks and frogs to eat in the pond? (They would not be able to live there.) DOK L2 Scaffolding Instruction English Language Learners: Children may not understand that the word in has more than one meaning. Read aloud these sentences: “Many kinds of fish swim in a pond. Ducks swim in the water.” Explain that the first sentence means that the fish swim below the water. The second sentence means that the ducks swim on top of the water. Display the photographs on pp. 9 and 11 and point out where the animals are swimming. Strategic Support: Children may have difficulty understanding that there are many different kinds of fish that can live in a pond. Display the photograph on p. 9 and explain that this is one kind of fish. If possible, show photographs of other kinds of fish that can live in a pond. Benchmark Vocabulary Objectives: Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text. RL.K.4 Use words acquired from texts. L.K.6 Sort words into categories. L.K.5.a Text-Based Vocabulary: • dive, p. 10 • underwater, p. 10 Practice: Use p. 39 in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the Benchmark Vocabulary. Monitor children’s vocabulary development. Text Analysis ANIMAL NAMES AND ACTIONS Explain that writers can use different words to tell about a topic. Readers can sort these words into groups to help them better understand the topic. Display the Two Sorting Boxes graphic organizer on p. TR46. MODEL On pages 8–13 of Life in a Pond, the author tells about animals and about actions by the animals. We can sort those words into two groups: names of animals and actions of animals. The first animal name I see is fish. I’ll write that in the top box. The first action word I see is swim. I’ll write that in the bottom box. PRACTICE/APPLY Have children work together to identify other animal names and actions on pp. 8–13. Write these in the boxes. Use the Small Group Discussion Routine on pp. TR10–TR11 to have children discuss how sorting words into categories helps them better understand the topic of this text section. Check understanding by asking children to share or by circulating among children or groups. Make sure they are using best practices for speaking and listening as outlined in the routine. Guided Reading/Independent Practice (Focused Independent Reading, Small Group Options, Reading Analysis Extension) Focused Independent Reading Close Reading Extension Today’s Process Focus: Engagement and Identity Have children record their reading in a daily reading log by drawing a picture about the book and dictating a few words about why they chose it. Encourage them to copy the title into their reading log. Today’s Strategy Focus: Vocabulary Knowledge Have children review with you the colored tabs they placed in their book. Ask them to read each word with a tab and explain whether it belongs in the animal group or the action group. Alternatively, help children log into Pearson Realize and review with you the Independent Reading Activity they completed for their book. Reread “Gadget Is Gone!” on p. TR4 in this Teacher’s Guide. Write these words and phrases and read them aloud: empty, guinea pig, loves grapes, lost, gone, munching. Have pairs of children sort the words and phrases into two categories. Provide each pair with a two sorting boxes graphic organizer. Have partners decide which words to write into each box and dictate or write a label for each box. Ask children how sorting vocabulary from the story helps them understand what the story is about. Literacy/Reading Workshop- Thursday, October 4 Lesson: 4 Unit: 1 Module: B Anchor Text: Life in a Pond Objective: Describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear. RL.K.7, Engage in group reading activities. RL.K.10 Essential Questions: How do readers use text evidence to answer questions about informational text? How do writers explain information about a topic? (Build Understanding, Close Read, Benchmark Vocabulary, Text Analysis) Build Understanding First Read: pp. 14–19 Set the Purpose: Readers understand that answering questions helps them understand information in texts. Asking and answering questions about the words and pictures in a text will help us understand information in the text. Engage Children: Display the front cover of Life in a Pond. Have children use the title and photograph to recall details about the book. Then display the Table of Contents. Remind children how to use a table of contents. Then point to “Pond Plants” and ask children to identify which page you should turn to. Read: Have children point out the first word in each sentence on p. 14. Have them look at the photographs as you read. In this reading, children should focus on asking and answering questions about the text to better understand it. Turn and Talk: What does the text say grows in the water? Close Read Second Read: pp. 14–19 Cite Text Evidence: • What is the title of this section? (“Pond Plants”) Have children read the title with you as you point out each word. How does the title of a section help you when you are reading? (Possible response: I know I will learn about pond plants in this section.) DOK L3 • Have your “reading sleuths” work in pairs to find and read aloud the words that answer this question: What kinds of plants grow in a pond? (water lilies and cattails) DOK L1 • Why do you think the plants on page 17 are named cattails? (A cattail has a brown, fuzzy tip that looks like a cat’s tail.) DOK L2 • Why is it important that sunlight shines through pond water? (It is important because it needs to reach the plants that grow on the bottom of the pond. All plants need sunlight.) DOK L2 • Look back through the pages of “Pond Plants.” What questions do you have? (Responses will vary.) Why is asking and answering questions about a text important? (It helps readers get information they need from a text.) DOK L3 Scaffolding Instruction English Language Learners: Children may not understand the word tip in reference to the cattails. Explain that tip means “the end part.” Have children hold up one hand. Ask them to use their other hand to point to the tip of each of their fingers. Strategic Support: Children may have difficulty understanding why it is important to know that sunlight reaches the bottom of the pond. Remind children that plants are living things. They need water, food, sunlight, and shelter to survive. Benchmark Vocabulary Objectives: Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text. RL.K.4 Use words acquired from texts. L.K.6 Identify connections between words in a text and their use in real life. L.K.5.c Text-Based Vocabulary: • bloom, p. 14 • float, p. 14 Practice: Use p. 41 in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the Benchmark Vocabulary. Monitor children’s vocabulary development. Text Analysis WORDS AND THEIR USE Explain to children that texts often have words readers can use in their daily lives. Readers can think about how they can make connections between words in the text and their use in real life. Display the Three-Column Chart on p. TR44 with the headings float, fuzzy, and bloom. Read aloud the headings. MODEL The text says that water lily leaves float on the water. I know that to float means “to rest on the top of water.” I’ll write that in the first column under float. What are some other things you know that can float? Let’s write them on the chart too. PRACTICE/APPLY Have children work together to connect the words fuzzy and bloom to their use in people’s everyday lives. Write their ideas on the chart. Use the Small Group Discussion Routine on pp. TR10–TR11 to have children discuss how it helps them better understand the words by making connections between their use in the text and their use in real life. Check understanding by asking children to share or by circulating among children or groups. Make sure they are using best practices for speaking and listening as outlined in the routine. Guided Reading/Independent Practice (Focused Independent Reading, Small Group Options, Reading Analysis Extension) Focused Independent Reading Language Analysis Extension Today’s Process Focus: Engagement and Identity Have children record their reading in a daily reading log by drawing a picture or dictating or writing a word, phrase, or sentence about their book. Suggest that they also draw pictures of the book’s topic in their reading log. Today’s Strategy Focus: Vocabulary Knowledge Have children review with you the colored tabs they placed in their book. Ask them to explain how the word bloom or float relates to the picture. Alternatively, have children log into Pearson Realize and review with you the Independent Reading Activity they completed for their book. Have children review the meanings of the words float, fuzzy, and bloom using the Three-Column Chart. Ask children if they can add any other objects to the lists. Then have them use each of the words in complete sentences. Literacy/Reading Workshop- Friday, October 5th Lesson: 5 Unit: 1 Module: B Anchor Text: Life in a Pond Objective: Describe the connection between two ideas or pieces of information in a text. RI.K.3, Engage in group reading activities. RL.K.10 Essential Questions: How do readers use text evidence to answer questions about informational texts? How do writers explain information about a topic? (Build Understanding, Close Read, Benchmark Vocabulary, Text Analysis) Build Understanding First Read: pp. 20–21 Set the Purpose: Learners understand that the environment affects living things. We can connect facts and ideas in Life in a Pond to help us understand how the environment affects the plants and animals that live there. Engage Children: Display the front cover of Life in a Pond. Have children use the title and illustration to recall details about the book. Read: Have children look at the photographs and follow the words from left to right and top to bottom as you read. Point out how you follow the words from page to page. In this reading, children should focus on who lives together in a pond and how they live together. Turn and Talk: Who lives together in a pond? Close Read Second Read: pp. 20–21 Cite Text Evidence: • Have children listen closely to this sentence and then read it chorally with you: “Many plants and animals live together in ponds.” What does it mean to live together? (live in the same place; help each other) DOK L1 • Point out the sentence in the text that says that animals find food in ponds. Ask children to point out the words find and food. What are some ways animals find food? (They dive underwater. They find insects.) DOK L1 • Look at the picture. Which animal did you learn about earlier in the book? (the frog) Show me the words and pictures that told you about the animal. Let’s read the sentences on page 12 together. DOK L3 • Display the photographs on pp. 13 and 21. How are these frogs alike? (They both swim. They both live in a pond.) How are they different? (One frog is green. One frog has black spots.) DOK L2 •What would happen if the plants could not get enough pond water? (They would not be able to grow.) DOK L2 Scaffolding Instruction English Language Learners: Children may struggle to recall vocabulary as they answer questions using information from previous pages in the book. Read the pages aloud and have children identify words they can use to answer the questions. Review the meanings of the words with children, if necessary. Strategic Support: Children may have difficulty comparing and contrasting the frogs in the photographs on pp. 13 and 21. Draw a Venn diagram on the board. Display the photographs one at a time and have children identify details about the frog in the picture. Record the details in the diagram. Then have children use the Venn diagram to talk about how the frogs are alike and different. Benchmark Vocabulary Objectives: Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text. RL.K.4 Use words acquired from texts. L.K.6 Describe the connection between two ideas or pieces of information in a text. RI.K.3 Text-Based Vocabulary: • together, p. 20 Practice: Use p. 43 in the Reader’s and Writer’s Journal to show contextual understanding of the Benchmark Vocabulary. Monitor children’s vocabulary development. Text Analysis MAKE CONNECTIONS Explain to children that authors and illustrators are important to stories. Display the T-Chart on p. TR43 with the headings Author and Illustrator. MODEL “Plants and animals live together in ponds” is an important idea in this text. I will put it in the center of the web. I want to find details that support this idea. One detail is that fish live in a pond. What are some other details that support the idea? Let’s write them on the web too. PRACTICE/APPLY Have children identify other details on pp. 10–18 that support the idea. Write these on the web. Use the Small Group Discussion Routine on pp. TR10–TR11 to have children discuss why it is important to make connections when reading a text. Check understanding by asking children to share or by circulating among children or groups. Make sure they are using best practices for speaking and listening as outlined in the routine. Guided Reading/Independent Practice (Focused Independent Reading, Small Group Options, Reading Analysis Extension) Focused Independent Reading Reading Analysis Extension Today’s Process Focus: Engagement and Identity Have children record their reading in a daily reading log by drawing a picture of or dictating or writing a word, phrase, or sentence about the most important theme or idea in their book. Encourage them to copy the title of their book into their reading log. Today’s Strategy Focus: Critical Thinking Have children answer the question, pointing out connections between pictures and explaining they helped them understand the book. Read aloud “A New Home for Hermit Crab” on pp. 55–57 of the Text Collection. Give children a web with Animals live together in tide pools in the center circle. Have them discuss the animals described in the article with a partner and add drawings to the web to provide additional detail. Then have partners compare and contrast their web with the Plants and animals live together in ponds web that the class completed. Writing Workshop- Monday October 1 WRITING 30 -40 Minutes (Informative/Explanatory Writing, Independent Writing Practice) Writing Focus: Make a List Writing Objectives: Draw, dictate, or write to compose informative texts. W.K.2 Participate in a shared informative/explanatory writing task. W.K.7 Set the Purpose: Tell children that in informative/explanatory writing, writers give facts and details about a specific topic. One kind of informative/explanatory writing is a list. Tell children that today they will make a list by drawing pictures of animals and then writing the words for the animals. Teach and Model: Explain to children that when writing informative/explanatory text, a writer sometimes makes a list of important words that are in the book. These words are in the glossary. A writer will also list important ideas and names in a list called the index. Writers can also make a list to help them organize their ideas before writing. By writing a list, readers can remember details about important words in a text. This will help readers understand the facts in the text. Help children understand how the writer uses a list in the book. PREPARE TO WRITE Explain to children that when they are reading informational text, they may refer to lists, such as the glossary and index, to gain or clarify information. Writers create those lists in order to help the reader understand the topic. In an informational text, the lists should be facts about the topic. IDENTIFY FACTS AND OPINIONS Remind children that a fact is something that can be proven true and an opinion is what someone thinks or feels. Give an example of a fact and of an opinion. Elephants live in the rain forest. This is a fact. We can prove it is true. Elephants are scary. This is an opinion. It is what someone thinks or feels. UNDERSTAND LISTS Sometimes writers make a list to help them organize their ideas before they start writing. Give children an example of making a list in order to help them understand how to use it before they write. For example, if I wanted to write a book about elephants, I might start by making a list of all the things I know about elephants. MAKE A GROUP LIST Ask children to help you make a list on the board or on chart paper stating things they know about elephants. Some possible responses are big, gray, live in forests or deserts, have trunks, have big ears, and live in family groups. INDEPENDENT WRITING PRACTICE Writing: Tell children that they will be working on a shared writing project called “Pond Mural.” Today they will complete the first step. Have children draw and dictate or write a list of animals and plants that live in a pond. Then have them share their list with the class. Create a class list on the board. Then discuss with children how they can find out more kinds of plants and animals that live in ponds. Remind children to think about how to make a list and to think about how readers will use a list. Have them write the list on p. 35 of their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal. Share Writing: Take a few minutes to wrap up today’s writing with children. Ask volunteers to share their writing with the class. Ask the class to identify the animals and plants on their lists. Writer’s Workshop- Tuesday, October 2 WRITING 30 -40 Minutes (Informative/Explanatory Writing, Independent Writing Practice) Writing Focus: Describe a Place Writing Objectives: Draw, dictate, or write to compose informative texts. W.K.2 Participate in a shared informative/explanatory writing task. W.K.7 Set the Purpose: Remind children that in informative/explanatory writing, writers give facts and details about a specific topic. One kind of informative/explanatory writing describes, or tells about, someone or something. Tell children that today they will describe and draw the pond for their mural. Teach and Model: Explain to children that when writing informative/explanatory text, a writer uses details to describe, or tell more about, a person, place, or thing. The person, place, or thing that the informative text is about is called the topic. The details that the writer adds help the reader better understand the topic of the text. Help children understand how the writer gives details about a place in Life in a Pond. PREPARE TO WRITE Explain to children that when writers describe something, they tell what it looks like, sounds like, feels like, smells like, and/or tastes like. Children can describe the pond in the photographs by telling what it looks like. There are many words that can be used to tell what something looks like. BRAINSTORM DETAILS Explain to children that they will be working on the “Pond Mural” and will be describing a pond through drawing and writing. As a class, look at the photographs on pp. 4–7 in Life in a Pond. Ask children to tell as much detail as they can about the hotographs they see. WRITE DETAILS Write children’s responses on the board or chart paper. Use the list as a guide when children draw the mural and add details. INDEPENDENT WRITING PRACTICE Writing: Remind children that they are completing a shared writing activity with the class called “Pond Mural.” Display the completed list of descriptive details about ponds that children worked on together. Tell children that they will use the details about ponds to create a mural of a pond. They will draw the pond on the mural using details from Life in a Pond. Have children write a detail that includes a describing word about a pond on p. 37 of their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal. Conventions: If you wish to teach children about nouns for places, use the Conventions Mini-Lesson on p. 181. Help children recall the nouns for places pond, forests, farms, and cities in the text. Share Writing: Take a few minutes to wrap up today’s writing with children. Ask volunteers to share their writing with the class. Ask the class to identify the words that tell what the pond looks like. Writer’s Workshop- Wednesday, October 3 WRITING 30 -40 Minutes (Informative/Explanatory Writing, Independent Writing Practice) Writing Focus: Write Labels Writing Objectives: Draw, dictate, or write to compose informative texts. W.K.2 Participate in a shared informative/explanatory writing task. W.K.7 Set the Purpose: Explain to children that when writing an informative/explanatory text, a writer sometimes includes photographs or illustrations with labels. A label is a word or phrase added to a picture to name a person, animal, place, or thing in the picture. The label tells the reader the name of the person, animal, place, or thing. Tell children that today they will draw the plants and animals on the pond mural and write labels to identify each plant or animal. Teach and Model: Using pp. 8–13 of Life in a Pond, model for children how to add labels to photographs. Display the photograph on p. 9. Use self-stick notes to label the fish and the gills in the photograph. Explain to children that writers can include photographs or illustrations in a book to help readers understand what someone or something looks like. Labels can help readers understand what a picture shows. Explain to children that in this particular informational text, there are no labels with the photographs. Labels sometimes come in the form of captions in other types of texts. Tell children that labels are good for readers to refer to if they want to go back into the text quickly to look something up. Encourage children to ask questions if they do not understand the use of labels. PREPARE TO WRITE Explain to children that a label is a quick way to tell readers what a photograph or illustration shows. Display an informational text that has a label consisting of a word or phrase next to illustrations or photographs. Read one or more labels. Explain that by labeling the plants and animals on their class mural, children can make sure that people who view the mural will know what each plant or animal is. LABEL AN ILLUSTRATION Give an example of adding labels to a photograph or illustration. Choose an informational text that has illustrations without captions or labels. Display a picture from the text. DISCUSS THE LABELS Have children suggest items in another photograph or illustration that could be labeled. Write the labels, or have children volunteer to write the labels, to add to the text. INDEPENDENT WRITING PRACTICE Writing: Have children revisit their drawing of the “Pond Mural.” Discuss what animals and plants they wish to draw in the mural. Display the list of animals and plants they created in Lesson 1. Ask children if there are any other animals or plants they would like to add to the list and then add to the mural. Tell children they will continue their shared writing project called “Pond Mural.” Display the class list. Have each child draw one of the plants and animals in the pond mural and copy its name onto a self-stick note. Have children place the notes on the mural to label their drawings. Remind them that the label should be placed beside the animal or plant it names. Tell them to write their label on p. 40 of their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal. Conventions: If you wish to teach children about nouns for things, use the Conventions Mini-Lesson on p. 191. Explain that nouns are words that can be used to name things as well as animals and places. Share Writing: Ask volunteers to point out one of the plant and animal drawings on the mural and say its name. Ask the class to discuss how the labels help viewers better understand the mural. Encourage children to speak audibly and express their ideas clearly. Writer’s Workshop Thursday, October 4 WRITING 30 -40 Minutes (Informative/Explanatory Writing, Independent Writing Practice) Writing Focus: Describe an Animal Writing Objectives: Draw, dictate, or write to compose informative texts. W.K.2 Participate in a shared informative/explanatory writing task. W.K.7 Set the Purpose: Explain to children that when writing informative/explanatory text, a writer uses facts, things that can be proven true, to tell more about a topic. Tell them that they will be revisiting the text to find facts about the plants and animals to add to their mural. Today they will choose a plant or animal to write or dictate a fact about. Teach and Model: Confirm children’s understanding of the use of facts by having them answer the following questions. • What is a fact? (a statement or piece of information that can be proven true) • How do facts help readers learn about things? (Possible response: Facts tell readers things they might not have known before.) • What facts do you know about ponds? (Possible responses: they are shallow, they are smaller than lakes, water lilies grow there) The writer uses facts to tell about plants that grow in ponds. The topic of the book is ponds and these facts tell true information about that topic. Explain to children that the topics that informational texts are usually about are people, places, animals, or things. Remind children that words for people, places, animals, or things are called nouns. PREPARE TO WRITE Remind children that someone conducted research to find facts for the text and information in Life in a Pond. Display another text with words and pictures about plants and/or animals. CHOOSE A PLANT OR ANIMAL Tell children that they can find facts about plants and animals in many different texts. Explain that you will choose a plant or animal from the text you are displaying and write a fact about it. CHOOSE A FACT Model looking for a fact about evergreen trees in the words and pictures in the book you are displaying. I can choose any one of the facts in the words and pictures to tell about an evergreen tree. I think the fact that an evergreen tree does not lose its needles in autumn is an interesting fact. I will choose this fact. Model writing the fact. Write your fact for children to use as a model. I can write this fact about evergreen trees: An evergreen tree does not lose its needles in autumn. INDEPENDENT WRITING PRACTICE Writing: Have children dictate or write a fact about a plant or animal from Life in a Pond. If you wish to complete this as a class activity, have children give suggestions of facts about the plants and animals in the mural. Write the facts on a sheet of paper and keep it close to the mural for visitors and guests to see as well as for children to revisit as they work with the mural in future lessons. Have them write their fact on p. 42 of their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal. Conventions: If you wish to teach children about using nouns for people, use the Conventions Mini-Lesson on p. 201. Remind children that you have previously discussed nouns that name animals, places, and things. Share Writing: Take a few minutes to wrap up today’s writing with children. Ask volunteers to share their writing with the class. Ask the class to identify the fact the writer uses. Writer’s Workshop- Friday, October 5th WRITING 30 -40 Minutes (Informative/Explanatory Writing, Independent Writing Practice) Writing Focus: Name a Topic Writing Objectives: Draw, dictate, or write to compose informative texts. W.K.2 Participate in a shared informative/explanatory writing task. W.K.7 Set the Purpose: Explain to children that when writing informative/explanatory texts, writers often name the topic they are writing about. Remind children that a topic is what the text is mostly about. The writer can name the topic by writing a heading. A heading is a word or phrase at the top of a section of text that tells what the section is about. The writer can also name the topic by writing a topic sentence. A topic sentence is a sentence that tells the reader what the text or a section of the text is about. Tell children that today they will choose a topic about the class mural and then write or dictate a sentence about the topic. Teach and Model: Through the discussion, help children understand that the writer uses a heading to tell what this section of the text is about. Help children understand that the writer also uses a topic sentence to tell readers more details about the topic of the section. PREPARE TO WRITE Remind children that writers choose topics and then structure the text around that topic. This includes headings and topic sentences. HEADINGS Model how as a writer you might choose a heading and topic sentence for your text. • Suppose I am writing a book about whales of the ocean. My book has several sections that tell different things about whales. These sections have headings. What are two headings that could be in my book? (Possible responses: Getting Food or Swimming to Safety) • If the heading on my first page is Getting Food, what could the first sentence, or the topic sentence, be? (Possible response: Some whales spend much of their day hunting for food.) Take time to go over the above example with children. Explain to them that some, not all, informational texts will have headings that help readers know what the sections of the texts will be about. TOPIC SENTENCES Explain that most informational texts will have a topic sentence at the beginning that tells the reader what the book or section will be about. Model writing a topic sentence about another topic from the discussion above. Suppose my topic is whales swimming in the ocean. My topic sentence could be “Whales can swim very long distances in the ocean.” This topic sentence tells more about my main topic, whales swimming in the ocean. Remind children how the writer of Life in a Pond uses a heading and a topic sentence to name and tell about the topic of the section. INDEPENDENT WRITING PRACTICE Writing: Point to the shared writing project “Pond Mural” and have children review the information. Ask them to identify possible topics about the mural. Create a class list of topics. Together choose a topic and write a heading that names the topic, for example, “Animals in a Pond.” Then have children draw a picture to illustrate the topic and dictate or write a sentence that tells about the topic. Have them put the class heading above their picture and their sentence below it. Have children write their sentence on p. 44 of their Reader’s and Writer’s Journal. Conventions: If you wish to teach children about nouns for more than one, use the Conventions Mini-Lesson on p. 211. Encourage children to look for nouns in the book that end in -s, such as gills, ducks, and frogs. Share Writing: Take a few minutes to wrap up today’s writing with children. Ask volunteers to share their writing with the class. Remind children to speak audibly and express their ideas clearly. End of the Module Common Core Standards Checklists/Assessment:

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